M: The Memory by Lucy Dawson #AtoZChallenge #audiobook

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

 

The Memory by Lucy Dawson
Audio book read by Clare Corbett

Summary

A haunting domestic drama about families and secrets.
“She’ll never forget…..I’ll never forgive. People always notice my daughter, Isobel. How could they not? Incredibly beautiful….until she speaks.”

An unsettling, little-girl voice, exactly like a childs, but from the mouth of a full grown woman. Izzie might look grown up, but inside she’s trapped. Caught in the day it happened…the day that broke her from within. .

“Our family fell apart that day, and we never could pick up the pieces.”

goodreads

My Thoughts

This book is described as an “unputdownable psychological thriller.” As a mystery I really enjoyed it, but to me it was not a psychological thriller. There wasn’t enough suspense for that in my opinion. To say that there is a supernatural theme to this story, doesn’t give anything away, but it does become a bit creepy at time. The story had many twists and turns, and unforeseen things happening which lead to an unexpected ending that I didn’t see coming. In my opinion this book is a great mystery with an inventive plot.

Audiobook – the narrator was able to portray the eeriness in this story where it was necessary. It didn’t lose anything at all in this format.

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the author

 

Lucy studied Psychology at Warwick University before becoming a children’s magazine editor. Her first bestselling book – His Other Lover – was published in 2008. Since then she has published four other novels and her work has been translated into numerous other languages. She lives in Exeter with her husband and children. Lucy finds writing in the third person uncomfortable.

 

Published in 2018 by Bookoutre
Paperback, 338 pages
Audiobook Published by Bolinda Audio, 10 hours 16 mins

#2020 Aussie Author Challenge

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

The Inn by James Patterson & Candice Fox #AtoZChallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

The Inn by James Patterson and Candice Fox

Summary

The Inn at Gloucester stands alone on the rocky New England shoreline. Its seclusion suits former Boston police detective Bill Robinson, novice owner and innkeeper. As long as the dozen residents pay their rent, Robinson doesn’t ask any questions.

Yet all too soon Robinson discovers that leaving the city is no escape from dangers he left behind. A new crew of deadly criminals move into the small town, bringing drugs and violence to the front door of the inn.

Robinson feels the weight of responsibility on his shoulders. His sense of duty compels him to fight off the threat to his town. But he can’t do it alone. Before time runs out, the residents of the inn will face a choice. – from the blurb

My Thoughts

Candice Fox really gives a fresh feel to James Patterson’s style of writing. As usual with Patterson/Fox collaborations there is a great storyline and cast of unique characters. You could even say quirky characters in some cases.

Even though parts of this story were predictable, I found this novel to be a page turner, with many twists and turns which kept me guessing until the end. I really enjoyed the short chapters, which I think work well in a crime novel. building the tension.

 

Star Rating:⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Authors

James Patterson is the world’s bestselling author and most trusted storyteller. He has created more enduring fictional characters than any other novelist writing today, with his Alex Cross, Michael Bennett, Women’s Murder Club, Private, NYPD Red, Daniel X, Maximum Ride, and Middle School series. He has sold over 380 million books worldwide and currently holds the Guinness World Record for the most #1 New York Times bestsellers. – Goodreads

Candice Fox is the middle child of a large, eccentric family from Sydney’s western suburbs composed of half-, adopted and pseudo siblings. The daughter of a parole officer and an enthusiastic foster-carer, Candice spent her childhood listening around corners to tales of violence, madness and evil as her father relayed his work stories to her mother and older brothers.
As a cynical and trouble-making teenager, her crime and gothic fiction writing was an escape from the calamity of her home life. She was constantly in trouble for reading Anne Rice in church and scaring her friends with tales from Australia’s wealth of true crime writers. Bankstown born and bred, she failed to conform to military life in a brief stint as an officer in the Royal Australian Navy at age eighteen. At twenty, she turned her hand to academia, and taught high school through two undergraduate and two postgraduate degrees. Candice lectures in writing at the University of Notre Dame, Sydney, while undertaking a PhD in literary censorship and terrorism. – Goodreads

Published 08 august 2019, by Century. 384 pages.

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

#2020 Aussie Author Challenge

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

Half the World in Winter by Maggie Joel #AtoZChallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

Half The World in Winter by Maggie Joel

Summary

It is London, 1880, and Lucas Jarmyn struggles to make sense of the death of his beloved youngest daughter; his wife, Aurora, seeks solace in rigid social routines; and eighteen-year-old Dinah looks for fulfilment in unusual places. Only the housekeeper, the estimable Mrs Logan, seems able to carry on.

A train accident in a provincial town on the railway Lucas owns claims the life of nine-year-old Alice Brinklow and, amid the public outcry, Alice’s father, Thomas, journeys to London demanding justice. As he arrives in the Capital on a frozen January morning his fate, and that of the entire Jarmyn family, will hinge on such strange things as an ill-fated visit to a spiritualist, an errant chicken bone and a single vote cast at a board room meeting. – blurb

Half the World in Winter

My Thoughts

I enjoyed the story line, and the historical setting of this book, but the plot was a little slow moving for me. The theme running through this novel is grief. Heartbreaking and all consuming grief. At times, it is very sad, and very dark, but it didn’t stop my enjoyment. I can’t really see how the nature of the plot could be anything other than dark. The book to me, has a sense of the coldness of winter running through it.

There were commas missing right through the book, which some might think a small thing, but that really did annoy me.

Quotes

“Inside 19 Cadogan Mews time had ceased. It no longer existed, it had no meaning. A silence had fallen that no one felt willing to break. Footsteps were muffled, and commands, if they were given at all, were given in muted whispers in the hallways and corridors. doors were kept closed and before entering hands hesitated on doorknobs and deep breaths were taken. An excuse not to enter at all was often found:”

‘It seemed that, though you could have the same parents, live almost the same number of years in the same house with the same people, it was no guarantee you would grow into the same type of person.’

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the Author

Maggie Joel

Maggie Joel is a British-born writer who lives in Sydney, Australia. She has been writing fiction since the mid-1990s and her short stories have been widely published in Australia in Southerly, Westerly, Island, Overland and Canberra Arts Review, and broadcast on ABC radio. She has had five novels published: ‘The Past and Other Lies’ (Pier 9,2009), ‘The Second Last Woman in England’ (Pier 9, 2010) winner of the FAW Christina Stead Award for Fiction, ‘Half the World in Winter’ (Allen & Unwin, 2014), ‘The Safest Place in London’ (Allen & Unwin 2016) and ‘The Unforgiving City’ (Allen & Unwin 2019).

Published in October 2014 by Allen & Unwin
Paperback 432 pages

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

Good Dogs Don’t Make it to the South Pole by Hans-Olav Thyvold #AtoZChallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

Good Dogs Don’t Make it to the South Pole by Hans-Olav Thyvold

Summary

The wisest and most inspiring book on friendship and ageing, written by a dog, that you’ll ever read.

The best thing you can aspire to in this world is company. whether it’s for pleasure of pain, a crowning or an execution; everything is better with company. You might say it all went to hell with Mrs. Thorkildsen, but you know what? It could have been worse, because Mrs. Thorkildsen had me to keep her company. And I had her. That’s what we had in common, her and me, what bound us together. We were company.

The Major, a World War Two veteran, breathes his last. Watching over him are his wife and his faithful companion, Tassen, the story’s narrator, who is, by his own admission, a couch potato and a one-man dog.

After the Major is gone, Tassen and Mrs. Thorkildsen settle into their new life, surrounded by books and stories of the 1911 race between Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen and Britain’s Captain Robert F. Scott to reach the South Pole. Regular visits to the local library and the bar next door provide all types of enlightenment.

However wen Mrs. Thorkildsen becomes ill, Tassen’s world begins to wobble.
blurb

Good Dogs Don't Make it to the South Pole

My Thoughts

I picked this book up because the dog on the cover was just so cute and irresistable. At first, I thought it was a lightweight book of cute dog stories, but nothing could be further from the truth.

As Mrs. Thorkildson ages and her health declines, Tassen is by her side, listening to her relate the story ofan expedition to the South Pole and the role dogs played. Tassen thoughts on hearing the story are very funny and yes, exactly what a dog would surely think.

There are so many animal insights in this book, some comical and some sad as he has imagined conversations with himself about what he sees around him and what he supposes Mrs. Thorkildsen is up to.

Even though there is a thread of humour through the book, the story is definitely not light and superficial. As an older person, I could very much identify with the  themes of  ageing, death, companionship and life which as an older person. I enjoyed this book very much.

Translated into English from Norwegian.

Recommendations

‘I love it. If your dog is going to read just one book this year – this is it’ – Tess Erngren

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Hans-Olav Thyvold was born in Norway in 1959. He has published several nonfiction books and also been a journalist, radio host and TV host. In 2017 he published his first work of fiction, Snille hunder kommer ikke til Sydpolen. The novel has now been translated into English and is published as Good Dogs Don’t Make it to the South Pole. Thyvold has previously written and published books about Roald Amundsen as well as Fridtjof Nansen – allenandunwin.com

First Published in Norway 2017. This edition published in Australia & New Zealand in 2019 by Allen & Unwin. Softcover, 297 pages

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

Images and author information: Goodreads

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

The Dry by Jane Harper #Atozchallenge #2020aussieauthors

The Dry by Jane Harper

Summary

Who really killed the Hadler family?
It hasn’t rained in Kiewarra for two years. Tensions in the farming commmunity become unbearable when three members of the Hadler family are discovered shot to death on their property. Everyone assumes Luke Hadler committed suicideafter slaughtering his wife and six year old son.

Federal Police investigator Aaron Falk returns to his hometown for the funerals and is unwillingly drawn into the investigation. As suspicion spreads through the town, Falk is forced to confront the community that rejected him twenty years earlier. Because Falk and his childhood friend Luke Hadler shared a secret, one which Luke’s death threatens to unearth….. – blurb

My Thoughts

I’ve said before that crime is not one of my favourite genres, but I really did enjoy this book. I took the advice of the comment on the back cover from the Daily Telegraph and read it in one sitting. It’s a very, quick and easy read but such a good plot with a few twists and turns, well rounded characters, and a really great sense of place.  I enjoyed reading about the secrets that were being held in this small town and the events that occurred because of them.

This book has been sitting on my bookshelf since I bought it when it was a new release.I was drawn to it because the author is a journalist from Melbourne, that I knew of from her previous work.  The Dry is her debut novel. There was a lot of media coverage at the time, and I’m usually not keen to read those books that are well hyped up. Eventually, I decided to give it a go, and I’m really pleased that I did.

Recommendations

“This is a story about heroism, the sins of the past, and the struggle to atone. But let’s not forget the redbacks, the huntsmen, the rabbit scourge and all that makes this a quintessential Australian story beautifully told.” – The Age

“Try to set aside one sitting to indulge in journalist Jane Harper’s page turning debut novel. The pace never falters.” – Daily Telegraph

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Jane Harper

Jane Harper is the international bestselling author of The Dry, Force of Nature and The Lost Man.
Jane is a New York Times and Sunday Times bestseller, and has won numerous top awards including the Australian Book Industry Awards Book of the Year, the Australian Indie Awards Book of the Year, the CWA Gold Dagger Award for Best Crime Novel, and the British Book Awards Crime and Thriller Book of the Year.
Her books are published in more than 36 territories worldwide, with The Dry in production as a major motion picture starring Eric Bana.
Jane worked as a print journalist for thirteen years both in Australia and the UK, and now lives in Melbourne.

Published in 2016, by Pan McMillan
Paperback, 342 pages

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads

#2020 Aussie Author Challenge

You can find my other blogs here: Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

A: Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood #AtoZChallenge

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

Summary

It’s 1843, and Grace Marks has been convicted for her involvement in the vicious murders of her employer and his housekeeper and mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no memory of the murders.

An up-and-coming expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness is engaged by a group of reformers and spiritualists who seek a pardon for Grace. He listens to her story while bringing her closer and closer to the day she cannot remember. What will he find in attempting to unlock her memories? – Goodreads

My Thoughts

Margaret Atwood has been described as “one of the most brilliant and unpredictable novelists alive” – Literary Review. I would have to agree with that statement. This is the third of Attwood’s books that I’ve read and they have all been highlight reads for me. Alias Grace is an absolute highlight.  The story of Grace Marks, one of the most well known female prisoners in the 19h century is a work of fiction based on fact. The end isn’t hidden from the reader. From the start the outcome is fairly obvious, but the way this book is written, the reader is still kept entranced and enthralled to the end. This book invoked so many emotions for me . I found it ‘unputdownable’. There were so many passages that I had to read over and over or stop and think about. I could easily describe Alias Grace as being very dark and sad but it is aso very humorous. I did often laugh out loud. My favourite genre is Historical Fiction and Alias Grace is the best of the best. 

Alias Grace, deservedly, has received many literary awards around the world.

 Quotes:

“If we were all on trial for our thoughts, we would all be hanged.”

“Sometimes at night I whisper it over to myself: Murderess, Murderess. It rustles, like a taffeta skirt across the floor.
Murderer is merely brutal. It’s like a hammer, or a lump of metal. I would rather be a murderess than a murderer, if those are the only choices.”

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa and grew up in northern Ontario, Quebec, and Toronto. She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master’s degree from Radcliffe College.

Throughout her writing career, Margaret Atwood has received numerous awards and honourary degrees. She is the author of more than thirty-five volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction and is perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman (1970), The Handmaid’s Tale (1983), The Robber Bride (1994), Alias Grace (1996), and The Blind Assassin, which won the prestigious Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood’s dystopic novel, Oryx and Crake, was published in 2003. The Tent (mini-fictions) and Moral Disorder (short stories) both appeared in 2006. Her most recent volume of poetry, The Door, was published in 2007. Her non-fiction book, Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth ­ in the Massey series, appeared in 2008, and her most recent novel, The Year of the Flood, in the autumn of 2009. Ms. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages, including Farsi, Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic and Estonian. In 2004 she co-invented the Long Pen TM.
Goodreads

Published December 1996 by Doubleday Nan A. Talese

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

Book Review: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

 

The Shadow of the Wind – The Cemetary of Forgotten Books #1

The Shadow of the Wind : Shadow of the Wind Series - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Summary

Barcelona, 1945: A city slowly heals from its war wounds, and Daniel, an antiquarian book dealer’s son who mourns the loss of his mother, finds solace in a mysterious book entitled The Shadow of the Wind, by one Julian Carax. But when he sets out to find the author’s other works, he makes a shocking discovery: someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book Carax has written. In fact, Daniel may have the last of Carax’s books in existence. Soon Daniel’s seemingly innocent quest opens a door into one of Barcelona’s darkest secrets–an epic story of murder, madness, and doomed love
Blurb

My Thoughts

This book had me hooked from the start. I loved the story of the young boy who was taken to the cemetery of forgotten books and told to choose a book. As the book progressed and the child became older, his life almost mirrored the life of the book he had chosen.There were many parallels between the life of the child and the author.  l found the story riveting and couldn’t leave it alone.

There is a theme of death throughout this novel, from start to finish, which raises its head in many different forms. The writing is beautiful. There were many passages, that, though romantic, had me laughing out loud.

There were a few things about the narrative, however, that grated a little. At times, there were aspects to the story and sequence of events that didn’t seem to me to be believable. Also, the conversations at times seemed a little stilted, but that could be because this book was translated from Spanish to English.

The things that annoyed me were few and far between, and I was able to put them to the side, so they didn’t interfere with my enjoyment of the story.

In the edition that I read there were bonuses at the end – an interview with the author, discussion notes and an illustrated Shadow of the Wind walk through the streets of Barcelona. I especially enjoyed the illustrated walk. It was the icing on the cake of this novel for me. 

Recommendation

“If you thought the true gothic novel died with the 19th century, this will change your mind. Shadow is the real deal. Be warned, you have to be a romantic at heart to appreciate this stuff, but if you are this is one gorgeous read” – Stephen King

“Zaffron’s tightly plotted thriller, is sharp, sexy, gothic (perhaps even a little goulish), powerfully atmospheric, often funny and utterly unputdownable – Australian

Quotes

Few things leave a deeper mark on a reader than the first book that finds its way into his heart.

Death was like a nameless and incomprehensible hand…like a hellish lottery ticket. But I couldn’t absorb the idea that death could actually walk by my side, with a human face and a heart that was poisoned with hatred.

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

Carlos Ruiz Zafón

About the author: Carlos Ruiz Zafón is a Spanish novelist. Born in Barcelona in 1964, he has lived in Los Ángeles, United States, since 1994, and works as a scriptwriter aside from writing novels.

This edition was published by Text Publishing, Melbourne in 2001.
Paperback, 536 pages

Thanks to my friend Kerryn for recommending this book

Book Review: The White Earth by Andrew McGahan

Summary

After his father’s death, young William is cast upon the charity of an unknown great-uncle, John McIvor. The old man was brought up, expecting to marry the heiress to Kuran Station—a grand estate in the Australian Outback—only to be disappointed by his rejection and the selling off of the land. He has devoted his life to putting the estate back together, and has moved into the once-elegant mansion.

McIvor tries to imbue William with his obsession, but his hold on the land is threatened by laws entitling the Aborigines to reclaim sacred sites. William’s mother desperately wants her son to become John McIvor’s heir, but no one realizes that William is ill and his condition is worsening.

Issues covered are Native Title legislation, the Mabo decison and Australian politics.

My Thoughts

When I first began to read this book, I had no idea what it was about. I wasn’t far into it when I realised this was the perfect book for me to read, in the week of Australia Day.

The setting is the Darling Downs in Queensland, spanning a time frame of 150 years. I really enjoyed the sense of place and landscape that this novel evoked. I loved it’s Australian-ness.

The publicity material describes this book as ‘part family saga, part history and part gothic thriller’. I agree with that completely. I do love a family saga and a historical novel, but the mention of gothic really had me intrigued. I’m not really interested in gothic or ghost stories, but I found the story to be entirely believable.

There is so much to this novel, including multiple themes but I would prefer to say less rather than more for fear of spoiling the reading experience for someone who picks up this book.

William was a lovely, beautiful, innocent young boy, but he was surrounded by very unattractive and flawed characters. This gave a dark and sinister feeling to the story. The characterisations by the author, I felt were brilliant.

I listened to this as an audio book. It didn’t lose any of the tension of gothicness in that form at all. The narrator, Edwin Hodgeman, an actor of many decades, was able to portray the darkness of certain characters and events in the story.

Recommendations

Winner of the Miles Franklin Award in 2005.
Winner of The Age Book of the Year Award in 2004

“…..The White Earth has all the trappings of a classic supernatural tale, and McGahan seamlessly blends the factual elements with the preernatural dimensions – the ghosts of black and white that haunt the landscape”  – The Age

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Andrew McGahan, was an Australian novelist, born 1966, in Queensland, Australia. He passed away in 2019 at age 52. He is  best known for his first novel Praise, and for his Miles Franklin Award-winning novel The White Earth. His novel Praise is considered to be part of the Australian literary genre of grunge lit.

This review is linked to lovelyaudiobooks.info
#2020 AussieAuthorChallenge

© 2019 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The Institute by Stephen King

 

The Institute - Stephen King

SUMMARY

Luke Ellis is abducted from his bed in the middle of a night, and his parents are murdered. The super intelligent twelve year old with special powers is spirited away in a black SUV. When he wakes, Luke is in a room, at The Institute, hidden deep in the forest at Maine. The room is set up to look like his own at home, but with one difference. There is no window. Luke soon realises that The Institute is home to many children, who arrived in the same way that he did. All of these children, along with being intelligent, have the extra special powers or telepathy and telekinesis.

The children of The Institute are subjected to a series of experiments. The staff are dedicated to these experiments, and don’t give any thought to the children’s desires. The children are rewarded for going along with the experiments, and punished very severely for choosing not to be compliant. As children that Luke has become close to, begin to disappear, he becomes desperate to find a way out and to get help. But nobody has ever escaped from The Institute.

MY THOUGHTS

I really did enjoy this book, although I felt it was a little bit flat and repetitive before the action started, towards the end. As is usual with a Stephen King novel, I find that in a review, less is best. I’d rather the reader dive in without knowing too much.

The large cast of child characters were very endearing, and I found myself caring very much about what was happening to them. King’s usual excellent characterisation was evident here. It’s my opinion that he is the master of characterisation. The story is mostly about the children and their experiences, with some great action towards the end.

What The Institute was doing to those children was horrifying, but I didn’t feel that I was reading one of King’s horror stories. I do prefer his books that make horror and unreal situations totally plausible. And I did enjoy this book. But I do have to declare that I am a fan of King and have been since I first read Carrie in 1975. As usual when reading a Stephen King novel, I find myself wondering ‘how on earth does he come’ up with his ideas’.

I found the author’s note at the end to be very very touching.

STAR RATING
⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

King at the 2007 Comic Con

Stephen King is a No. 1 Best Selling Author many times over. He is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Many of his books have been adapted into major films and TV series. King received the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.  In 2007, he won the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America and in 2015 he received America’s National Medal of Arts.

He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist, Tabitha King.

Published on 10 September 2019 by Scribner.
Softcover 482 pages plus author’s note.

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads and Booktopia

© 2019 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

Book Review: One Good Deed by David Baldacci

Summary

This novel, set in 1949, introduces a new character, Archer, a WW11 veteran who has recently been released from prison, where he served time for a crime he didn’t commit.

On his release, he encounters many obstacles that make it difficult to honour his parole conditions. His good intentions to stay out of trouble are challenged over and over.

My Thoughts

I enjoyed this character and look forward to the next in his series. The storyline had me hooked from the start and I enjoyed the historical aspect. I’m not a regular reader of crime but would definitely recommended this novel.

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the author

David Baldacci has been writing since he was s small child and his mother gave him a pen and notebook to write his stories down.

His first novel ‘Absolute Power’ was published in 1996. He has now had 39 novel published and translated into many languages. He has also written seven novels for younger readers.

David and his wife are co-founders of the Wish You Well Foundation which supports family and literacy programs in the United States.

Published 23 July 2019 by Grand Central Publishing

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Image and author information: Goodreads