Book Review: Lovesong by Alex Miller

7100633

Summary

Strangers did not, as a rule, find their way to Chez Dom, a small Tunisian cafe in Paris. Run by the widow Houria and her young niece, Sabiha, the cafe offters a home away from home for the North African immigrant workers at the great abattoirs of Vaugirard, who, as with Houria and Sabiha themselves, have grown used to the smell of blood in the air. When one day a lost Australian tourist, John Patterner, seeks shelter in the cafe from a sudden Parisian rainstorm, a tragic love story begins to unfold. – from the blurb

My Thoughts

I came to this book with a slight bias, as I have been an Alex Miller since reading two earlier novels of his – Coal Creek and The Passage of Love. This book, as I expected, didn’t disappoint at all. This is my second read of this novel. I love Alex Miller’s style of writing and his characterisations. Passages of writing in this book are extremely beautiful and slowed down my reading, as I was compelled to read them over and over.

“John was the quiet type … Except when he was telling me his story. Even then there was something quiet and private in the way he spoke about himself and Sabiha; as if he was telling himself the story; going over it to find its meaning for himself. Looking for something he’d missed when it was happening to him”.

I felt empathy for the main characters, as their inner dialogue made me understand their turmoil. I didn’t love every character, but it was the author’s writing that had me form my opinions. I did have a love/hate relationship with some of the characters, but that only added to my enjoyment of the story.

This story is more than a love story. It’s also about power, struggle and loneliness and how they affect a love story. It is also a story within a story, which I found compelling.  This novel stayed with me and had me thinking long after I had finished reading it.

I read the hardcover version of this book. It is a beautifully presented book and will have a permanent position on my bookshelf. I’m sure I will read it again in the future for the beautiful writing.

Published 2009, by Allen & Unwin. Hardcover, 354 pages

Recommendations

“Miller belongs with Gunter Grass, Ismail Kadare and JM Coetzee. He is essential reading” – The Australian

“Alex Miller is one of our most profound and interesting writers” – Australian Book Review

Awards

New South Wales Premier’s Literary Award for Christina Stead Prize for Fiction & People’s Choice Award (2011)
Miles Franklin Literary Award Nominee (2010)
Prime Minister’s Literary Awards Nominee for Fiction (2010)
The Age Book of the Year (2010)
Australian Book Industry Award (ABIA) Nominee for Literary Fiction (2010)

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️


About the Author

Alex Miller

Alex Miller is one of Australia’s best-loved writers, and winner of the Melbourne Prize for Literature 2012. He is twice winner of Australia’s premier literary prize, The Miles Franklin Literary Award, first in 1993 for The Ancestor Game and again in 2003 for Journey to the Stone Country. He is also an overall winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, in 1993 for The Ancestor Game. His fifth novel, Conditions of Faith, won the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction in the 2001 New South Wales Premier’s Awards. In 2011 he won this award a second time with Lovesong. Lovesong also won the People’s Choice Award in the NSW Premier’s Awards, the Age Book of the Year Award and the Age Fiction Prize for 2011. In 2007 Landscape of Farewell was published to wide critical acclaim and in 2008 won the Chinese Annual Foreign Novels 21st Century Award for Best Novel and the Manning Clark Medal for an outstanding contribution to Australian cultural life.  Miller  is published internationally and widely in translation. 

Have you read this book? If so, I’d love to hear what you thought of it. I promise to reply to all comments left.

© 2019 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

Book Review: Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

Summary

Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself; he’s still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.

After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country’s rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself.- goodreads

My Thoughts

I was immediately drawn to this book when I picked it up in my favourite second hand bookshop. I love to read books about books or bookshops or bookclubs, and I was intrigued by the premise. I was expecting to read a book about an eccentric old man who handed out books to people who needed solace. The books would be exactly the type of book they needed at the time.

That theme was probably about one quarter of the story. It could have been really great if that particular story line had been developed. Instead it turned into some kind of weak, pathetic romance. I know weak and pathetic are harsh words but they are the first that come to mind.

I struggled to finish this book but continued on, in the hope that it would improve. After all, I had read many great reviews.

I dislike writing negative reviews and usually I don’t. This review is my first negative, and I only write it because there are so many positive reviews out there, that I feel I must share my opposite view.

Quotes

“There are books that are suitable for a million people, others for only a hundred. There are even remedies—I mean books—that were written for one person only…A book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that’s how I sell books.”:

”Books keep stupidity at bay. And vain hopes. And vain men. They undress you with love, strength and knowledge. It’s love from within.”

Recommendation

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Nina George was born in 1973 in Bielefeld, Germany and is a prize-winning and bestselling author, and freelance journalist.  She has published 26 books (novels, mysteries and non-fiction) as well as over hundred short stories and more than 600 columns. George has worked as a police reporter, columnist and managing editor for a wide range of publications.

Published in June 2015 by Crown, 392 pages.

Have you read this book? If so, I’d love to hear what you thought of it. I promise to reply to all comments left.

© 2019 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

Book Review: The Black Swan of Paris by Karen Robards

The Black Swan of Paris by Karen Robards

Summary

A World at war.
A beautiful young star.
A mission no one expected.
Paris 1944

Celebrated singer Genevieve Dumont is both a star and a smokescreen. An unwilling darling of the Nazis, her position of privelege allows her to go undetected as an ally to the resistance.
When her estranged mother, Lillian de Rocheford, is captured by Nazis, Genevieve is shaken. She knows it won’t be long before the Gestapo succeeds in torturing information out of Lillian that will detail the upcoming allied invasion. The resistance movement is tasked with silencing her by any means necessary – including assassination.
But Genevieve refuses to let her mother become yet one more victim of the war. Reuniting with her long lost sister, she must find a way to navigate the perilous cross currents of occupied France undetected – and in time to save Lillian’s life. – from the blurb

My Thoughts

I am a huge fan of historical fiction and particularly when the setting is France during WW2. I’m especially interested when the story line is about the French resistance during the war. Unsurprisingly then, I was really looking forward to reading this book.

I enjoyed the themes of WW2, spies and family disfunction. Most of the connections and history were told by using flashbacks. At first I found it a little confusing, but soon became accustomed to the style and enjoyed each chapter as the true story was revealed.

The stories of the Nazis and their tactics were believable, but at times difficult to read due to the cruelty of the Nazis. The conflict between them and the Parisians and French people was at times heartbreaking.

The strength of three women was a theme that I enjoyed also. Their characterisations and believability had me glued to the page. None of these female characters were predictable or ordinary but they were entirely believable and relatable.

The only thing that detracted from my enjoyment of this book was the romantic theme which I didn’t think was necessary to the story line. After it was introduced, I became quite annoyed and could have lost interest. I’m glad I persisted to the end as the finale action scene is fantastic. This was the reason for a lower star rating.

Recommendations

“A truly outstanding novel, brilliantly written, that captured me and held me in its grip from page one. At its heart this story is about family love and the umbilical cords that stretch but never break. So much can be learnt from the telling of this story of what is truly important whether we live in a privileged, safe environment or in a theatre of conflict. The Black Swan of Paris reminds us of the power of love, hope and courage.”
Heather Morris, #1 bestselling author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz

“Long a master of suspense, Karen Robards turns her formidable talents to the Second World War. The Black Swan of Paris tells of singer Genevieve Dumont, who must navigate a tangled web of torn allegiances, painful secrets and a past that refuses to set her free, as she struggles to save all she holds dear from the Nazis. Boldly conceived and richly realized, Robards establishes herself in a single sweep at the forefront of World War II novels with an emotional and powerful tale.”
Pam Jenoff, New York Times bestselling author of The Lost Girls of Paris

Published in Great Britain by Hodder & Stoughton in 2020.
Paperback, 473 pages

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the Author

Karen Robards

Karen Robards is a best selling author of more than fifty books and one novella. Karen has been writing since she was very young, and was first published nationally in the December 1973 Reader’s Digest. She sold her first romance novel, ISLAND FLAME, when she was 24. It was published by Leisure Books in 1981 and is still in print. After that, she dropped out of law school to pursue her writing career.
Karen was recently described by The Daily Mail as “one of the most reliable thriller….writers in the world.”

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

The Good Turn by Dervla McTiernan

The Good Turn (Cormac Reilly, #3)

The Good Turn (Cormac Reilly #3) by Dervla McTiernan

Summary

Police corruption, an investigation that ends in tragedy and the mystery of a little girl’s silence – three unconnected things that will prove to be linked by one small town.

While Detective Cormac Reilly faces enemies at work, and trouble in his personal life, Garda Peter Fisher is relocated out of Galway, with the threat of prosecution hanging over his head. But even that is not as terrible as having to work for his overbearing father, the local copper for the pretty seaside town of Roundstone.

For some, like Anna and her young daughter, Tilly, Roundstone is a refuge from trauma. But even this village on the edge of the sea isn’t far enough to escape from the shadows of evil men. – Goodreads

My Thoughts

Having read the first two books in the Cormac Reilly series, I was looking forward to the thIrd being published, and it didn’t disappoint. McTiernan continued her realistic and relatable characterisations. The story line is believable, and as usual her research of police proceedure is impeccable.  Cormac is trying to solve the crime of a child abduction with an understaffed and inexperienced team. He is also dealing with his superiors and their lack of support. At the same time, he is having huge problems in his personal life.

I was gripped by the story line, and couldn’t wait to read what would happen next. Each time I thought I hold solved the mystery, there would be another twist. There are many small story lines running through the novel, and it was not clear, where they all fit in, until the end, when they are tied up perfectly. There were so many things, throughout this novel, to think and wonder about.

The Cormac Reilly series has been brilliant, but The Good Turn is next level.  I really enjoyed the Irishness of each book. Looking forward to #4 in this series.

Recommendations

‘With her third novel Dervla McTiernan confirms she’s a born storyteller’
Val McDermid

‘Taut, tense and darkly addictive’ — Candice Fox

Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the Author

Dervla McTiernan is the author of  The Ruin, The Scholar and The Good Turn. The Ruin was published in 2018 and is the first in the detective Cormac Reilly series. The Ruin was a top ten bestseller and an Amazon Best Book of July 2018. Dervla was a New Blood Panellist at Harrogate Festival. The Scholar was published in 2019 and was a top five bestseller. The Good Turn was published in 2020. The Ruin has been optioned for TV by Hopscotch Features

Published in February 2020 by Sphere
Paperback, 400 pages

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

Book Review: A Room Made of Leaves by Kate Grenville

50993145Summary

“What if Elizabeth Macarthur – wife of the notorious John Macarthur, wool baron in the earliest days of Sydney – had written a shockingly frank secret memoir? And what if novelist Kate Grenville, had miraculously found and published it? That’s the starting point for A Room Made of Leaves, a playful dance of possibilities between the real and the invented.
Marriage to a ruthless bully, the impulses of her heart, the search for power in the society that gave women none, this Elizabeth Macarthur manages her complicated life with spirit and passion, cunning and sly wit. Her memoir lets us hear – at last – what one of those seemingly demure women from history might really have thought.
At the centre of A Room Made of Leaves is one of the most toxic issues of our own age, the seductive appeal of false stories. This book may be set in the past, but it’s just as much about the present, where secrets and liws have the dangerous power to shape reality”. – from the blurb

My Thoughts

This fictional account of the life of Elizabeth Macarthur seemed very real to me. I would love to believe that the real Elizabeth Macarthur had the spirit and confidence of this fictional version. The story of the life of Elizabeth Macarthur starts at the beginning, in England when young Elizabeth met John Macarthur and how she came to marry the pompous and arrogant man. We followed them during their hellish voyage to Australia, and as they began their life in the new country, that, at first, was far less comfortable than expected.

As is usual for Kate, this book is well researched and very clearly tells the story of life in Sydney, in the very early days of settlement. I very much enjoyed reading about these times through the eyes of a strong female.

Historical fiction is my favourite genre and especially Australia historical fiction. I’ve read Kate Grenville’s books Secret River and The Lieutenant, and have been a fan ever since. This book didn’t disappoint at all. I found it totally engrossing and felt sad when I had read the last page. My opinion is that this wonderful novel is historical fiction at it’s best.

Next on my ‘to be read’ pile is the real biography of Elizabeth Macarthur which I’m keen to read.

Recommendations

‘This story, told through Grenville’s sharp lens, is one that will stay with the reader for a long time.’  – Readings

‘An ingenious tapestry of history and invention, A Room Made of Leaves is a novel of womanhood, motherhood, secrets, lies, obsession, transformation and the loss of innocence. It’s a true pleasure to read Grenville’s writing, and this one’s been well worth the wait!’ Booktopia

“Grenville’s prose is elegant and meticulously crafted…Despite the trappings of history in A Room Made of Leaves and Grenville’s impressive use of the archive to conjure the novel, her achievement here is not a historical one. A Room Made of Leaves questions,  rhetorically, how to live ethically with a history that is unfair.  Saturday Paper

 Published in 2020 by Text Publishing Company, Melbourne, Australia
Hardcover, 317 pages

My Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Kate Grenville is one of Australia’s most celebrated writers. Her international  bestseller The Secret River was awarded local and overseas prizes, has been adapted for the stage and as an acclaimed television miniseries, and is now a much-loved classic.
In 2017 Grenville was awarded the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature. She lives in Melbourne. – kategrenville.com.au

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads .

Aussie Author Challenge

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

 

 

.

australian reading challenge

Zodiac by Sam Wilson #atozchallenge #audiobook

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

Zodiac by Sam Wilson
Audiobook Read By John Chancer

In a corrupt and volatile society where people are divided and defined by zodiac signs, status is cast at birth and binding forever. The line between a life of luxury and an existence of poverty can be determined by the stroke of midnight.
When a series of uniquely brutal murders targets victims of totally different signs, is it a misguided revolution or the work of a serial killer?
All eyes are on Detective Jerome Burton and Profiler, Lindi Childs. They may disagree over whether the answers are written in the stars, but they are united by their belief that a grand plan is being executed  –
Goodreads

A thrilling debut in a society divided along Zodiac lines, status is cast at birth – and binding for life. Who you are can be determined by a matter of days, hours, or even minutes – borrowbox, audiobook

My Thoughts

I wasn’t sure of this story, when I first started listening to the audio book, but it didn’t take me long to get into what was happening, and from then on I was hooked into the story. The premise of the story is unbelievably original. Actually I would never have thought of a storyline where people are judged by their star sign, and the date and time of their birth. Their race or colour doesn’t matter at all.

Zodiac is a debut novel for this author, and I really look forward to reading his next book. This is the most clever and original thriller that I have read. As I got further into the story, it didn’t seem at all strange that people were judged on their star sign. It felt totally normal even though at times it does challenge your thinking. And then, there is the action packed ending. But enough of that. No spoilers. I recommend you do read this book.

Recommendations

‘A brilliant, original and gripping thriller. I’m struggling to think of a reader who won’t love this’ – Sarah Lotz, author of The Three

A bold storyteller with an amazing mind’ – Lauren Huxley

‘Impeccable storytelling. Undoubtedly a book which works both on the level of it’s ibntriguing high concept and sheer narrative nous’ – Barry Forshaw

Published 2016 by Penguin
Audiobook: Duration 11 hours, 36 minutes – unabridged.

My Star Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the Author

Sam Wilson

Sam Wilson is a writer and TV director working in Cape Town.

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads .

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

 

The Ex by Alafair Burke #atozchallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

Summary

In the vein of Gone Girl and The Girl on a Train comes this novel. After agreeing to defend her ex-fiance when he is arrested for a triple homicide, top criminal lawyer, Olivia Randall begins to have doubts as the evidence mounts against him. Twenty years ago she ruined his life. Now she has the chance to save it.

My Thoughts

I struggled with this book. Firstly I picked the murderer right away. I’m rarely that clever. The main reason I chose to read this book was the title. In trying to find a book for the letter X, Ex was the closest I could get. I loved the cover so chose to go ahead with it. If not for the A to Z Challenge, I probably wouldn’t have continued with it, so find it difficult to recommend it as a good read. At first, I struggled with posting this review but I have committed to reviewing every book I read, no matter what. Another reader might enjoy what I don’t enjoy.

Published in January 2016 by Harper, 304 pages

Star Rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the Author

Alafair Burke

Alafair Burke is the New York Times bestselling author of “two power house series” (Sun-Sentinel) that have earned her a reputation for creating strong, believable, and eminently likable female characters, such as NYPD Detective Ellie Hatcher and Portland Deputy District Attorney Samantha Kincaid. Alafair’s novels grow out of her experience as a prosecutor in America’s police precincts and criminal courtrooms, and have been featured by The Today Show, People Magazine, The New York Times, MSNBC, The Washington Post, USA Today, and The Chicago Sun-Times. According to Entertainment Weekly, Alafair “is a terrific web spinner” who “knows when and how to drop clues to keep readers at her mercy.- Goodreads

To keep up with the latest book reviews, please pop your email address in the box on the sidebar. This will ensure you are notified of updates.

All books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library, unless otherwise stated.

Find me here: Facebook and Instagram and Goodreads

Images and author information: Goodreads .

Links to my other blogs: Next Phase In Fitness & Life and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton #atozchallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge  is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted.

V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton

Summary

Another in Sue Grafton’s series of novels that are named after each letter of the alphabet. Investigator Kinsey Milhone, known by regular readers of this author, is based in a fictional city in Los Angeles and ready to solve the latest mystery.

In Las Vegas, a young college graduate is murdered when he is unable to pay back a loan funded by nororious criminal Lorenzo Dante.

Two years later, private investigator, Kinsey Millhone, finds herself assisting to apprehend a shoplifter – Audrey Vance. Events take a much darker turn when Audrey’s body is discovered beneath the Cold Spring bridge, a local suicide spot. Unable to believe she took her own life, Audrey’s fiance, Marvin Striker hires Kinsey to investigate. It soon emerges that the shoplifter had become caught up in a much larger operation. Meanwhile, Lorenzo Dante, has begun to grow weary of his life in organized crime, and is ftustrated with his violent and impulsive younger brother Cappi. While the police net begins to close in on him, Dante meets the beautiful Nora, who exerts a powerful pull over the gangster.

As Kinsey’s inquireies reach a dramatic head, it becomes clear that she and Dante have one thing in common – they must be careful who they trust…. – from the blurb

My Thoughts

I’ve only read one previous book in this epic series, and I enjoyed it as much as I did the first. Kinsey Milhone is an easy to like character who always seems to get her man. The story is written to a winning formula, however, I found it very enjoyable. This book is a very quick and easy read but with a ‘who dunnit’ storyline that had me turning the page.

I can’t help wondering how this series endures, for those fans who have read all books. I’m not so sure that I could read an alphabet of stories about one character.

Recommendations

“Sue Grafton’s mysteries are so consistently enjoyable you have to wonder what her secret is” – New York Times

“As the master of suspense continues to demonstrate in superb mystery after superb mystery, there are more ugly twists in the human heart that there are letters in the alphabet.” – Entertainment Weekly

Star Rating:⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

About the Author

Sue Grafton

Sue Grafton was a number One international bestselling and very prolific author of mystery and detective novels. Her books have been published in many languages and have appeared on The New York Times Bestseller lists many times and for many weeks each time. She passed away in 2017 before Z for Zero was published and so the alphabet series ends at Y.

Published in 2011 by Mantle, Pan McMillan
Paperback, 437 pages

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

Unsolved by James Patterson and David Ellis #AtoZChallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted

Unsolved – Invisible #2 by James Patterson and David Ellis

Summary

A chilling and shocking follow-up to Sunday Times bestseller Invisible by James Patterson.

FBI researcher, Emma Dockery is back with a vengeance. Obsessed with finding a link between a string of deaths across several different states, she is convinced that there’s a pattern. And where there’s a pattern, there’s a serial killer to put a stop to. When detectives working on some of the cases start turning up dead, Emma knows that she’s onto something. These deaths are murders, and she’s going to be the one to prove it.

The closer she gets to finding the killer, the more Emma feels like she’s being watched. Is she setting a trap for this depraved killer? Or with every step she takes, is she falling further into his web, with the death count rising, Emma must act fast to catch this killer, before she becomes the next name on the hit list. – from the blurb

Unsolved (Invisible, #2)

My Thoughts

I didn’t read Invisible 1, but it’s not necessary to read it before Unsolved. In fact, I didn’t realise this was a second book in a series until after I’d finished it. I have enjoyed the James Patterson collaborations that I’ve read so far, and this novel was no different. A fast paced, detective mystery with a great story line and a few twists along the way.

Of course, as with most James Patterson books, it’s obviously written to a formula which is quite cliche – the FBI agent who goes against protocol, but because she has great results she gets away with it.

 I enjoyed it this novel. It was a quick read with an interesting plot and unexpected twists.However, there is one thing that I didn’t like about this book and that was the ending. It just didn’t feel right to me, and left me disappointed at the end.

Star Rating: 3.5 star

About the Authors:

James Patterson

James Patterson is the world’s bestselling author and most trusted storyteller. He has created more enduring fictional characters than any other novelist writing today, with his Alex Cross, Michael Bennett, Women’s Murder Club, Private, NYPD Red, Daniel X, Maximum Ride, and Middle School series. He has sold over 380 million books worldwide and currently holds the Guinness World Record for the most #1 New York Times bestsellers. In addition to writing the thriller novels for which he is best known, among them The President Is Missing with President Bill Clinton, Patterson also writes fiction for young readers of all ages, including the Max Einstein series, produced in partnership with the Albert Einstein Estate. He is also the first author to have #1 new titles simultaneously on the New York Times adult and children’s bestseller lists. – Goodreads

David Ellis

 

David Ellis is a lawyer and the Edgar Allan Poe Award winner for Best First Novel for Line of Vision. Ellis attended Northwestern Law School and began his legal career in private practice in Chicago in 1993. He served as the House Prosecutor who tried and convicted Illinois Governor Blagojevich in the Impeachment Trial before the Illinois Senate. He was elected to the Illinois Appellate Court in 2014 and took office December 1, 2014. Ellis currently lives outside Chicago with his wife and three children.

Published 2019 by Little, Brown and Company
Audio book published by Bolinda Audio

You can find my other blogs here:
Next Phase In Fitness & Life
and Tracking Down The Family

© 2020Copyright all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com

T: The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger #atozchallenge

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is for bloggers who wish to participate by publishing a blog post every day in April except for Sundays. Each blog post will focus on a letter of the alphabet. For example April 1 will be A, April 2 will be B and on it goes. By the end of April, a blog post for every letter of the alphabet will have been posted

Summary

This is the extraordinary love story of Clare and Henry who met when Clare was six and Henry was thirty six, and were married when Clare was twenty two and Henry was thirty. Impossible, but true, because Henry suffers from a rare condition where his genetic clock periodically resets and he finds himself pulled suddenly into his past or future. In the face of this force, that they can neither prevent nor control, Henry and Clare’s struggle to lead normal lives is both intensely moving and entirely forgettable. – blurb

The Time Traveler's Wife

My Thoughts

When I read that first sentence in the summary, I couldn’t wait to get my head into this story. I read this book when it was first released in 2005. This debut novel is so good and unputdownable, even on the second reading. I’m not a lover of romance, but the author has written this book to be romantic and sentimental, but definitely not mushy or sugar sweet. 

The story does jump around a bit, between narrations and time frames, but I still found it to be an easy to read and not at all annoying, as some books can be that have changes in dates in their storyline. 

Even though, the premise of The Time Travellers Wife is unbelievable, and even absurd, I found the book to be totally believable. At first I found it difficult to get into the story, but as soon as I worked it what was happening, I couldn’t put the book down. I was convinced that it was possible for the events to occur. The love story was beautiful and tragic all at the same time.

The themes of love, passion, destiny and fate were all thrown in together to create this beautiful and unforgettable story.

Recommendations

“At it’s core, The Time Traveler’s Wife, is an old-fashioned love story. A terrific book…..startlingly original.’ – Observer

“Niffenegger exploits the possibilities of her fantasy scenario with immense skill: no wonder this novel has spent weeks on the bestseller lists. This is one of those books that makes you want to eat it up from start to finish”

“Pick up Niffenegger’s book, and you’ll experience the visceral thrill, that only a few novels provide. An elegy to love and loss” – Independent on Sunday

Star rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

About the author

Audrey Niffenegger

Audrey Niffenegger (born June 13, 1963 in South Haven, Michigan) is a writer and artist. She is also a professor in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Columbia College Chicago. Niffenegger’s debut novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife (2003), was a national bestseller.

Her Fearful Symmetry (2009), Niffenegger’s second novel, is set in London’s Highgate Cemetery where, during research for the book, Niffenegger acted as a tour guide.

Niffenegger has also published graphic and illustrated novels including: The Adventuress (2006), The Three Incestuous Sisters (2005), The Night Bookmobile (2009), and Raven Girl (2013). Raven Girl was adapted into a ballet by Resident Choreographer Wayne McGregor and the Royal Opera House Ballet (London) in 2013.

A mid-career retrospective entitled “Awake in the Dream World: The Art of Audrey Niffenegger,” was presented by the National Museum of Women in the Arts (Washington D.C.) in 2013. An accompanying exhibition catalogue examines several themes in Niffenegger’s visual art including her explorations of life, mortality, and magic.

Published 2004 by Vintage Books
Softcover, 539 pages

Have you read The Time Traveler’s Wife?  If so, I’d love to hear if you enjoyed it as much as I did. I love it when we have a conversation and promise to reply to all comments.

© 2020 Copyright. all rights reserved: bestbookishblog.com